Linda Roper's Reviews & Articles

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My space is too limited to extol the virtues of the entire cast, but I recommend you note the performances o fKeith Mueller, who plays Perapont, the porter and Linda
Roper, who plays Anfisa, the dedicated nanny.


Awful lovies, but all done superbly
Linda Macintosh as Dotty Otley and Jimmy Chisholm as Lloyd Dallas in Noises Off at the Brunton Theater.

Catch a 'Cabaret'

Linda Roper as Fraulein and Jeffrey Scully as Schultz create an endearing and heartbreaking subplot.  All of the performers carry themselves with an exacting and polished professionalism that is a pleasure to see.

Mama mia Luke O'Neill is touched by 'I Remember Mama',
...Linda Roper is particularly excellent as Mama, driving the action wth her convincing portrayal of a Norwegian immigrant dedicated wholly to her family.  Roper makes what could be a difficult role seem effortless.

and
A few of the actors struggle with the difficult Norwegian accent, with only Roper providing a flawless rendition...

 


I could go on and on now about Linda Roper in the titile role but space would not allow me to adquately express my admiration for the fabulous job that she did in the role of Mama. She had it all going on .  Her mannerisms, the accent, each inflection and gesture all came together to create a  seamless portrayal of a woman who is as ordinary as she is extraordinary, just like most moms.  I'm getting weepy now, just thinking about that scene when Katrin's passage into womanhood is marked by her first cup of coffee.  Ms. Roper's preparation of that cup of coffee was a masterful job of acting.

With Anne are Linda Macintosh as Constance Mozart...


Chillingly convincing performances here from Linda Macintosh,...

Night of the Iguana

Linda Roper sensitively slipped into, and never once left, the skin of long-suffering Hannah Jelkes, the penniless spinster who cares for her 97-year-old grandfather...

Chuck Muckle is Shannon and Linda Roper plays Hannah in "Night of the Iguana".


Saturday, May 8, 2010

Theatrical reading planned to help Maple Grove raise funds

by Anthony P. Musso For Focus

The Over the Pond to Poughkeepsie Ensemble will present a theatrical reading of the play, "Charlie's Birds", on May 16 to raise funds for the continuing restoration of Maple Grove, a 19th century historic house in Poughkeepsie. The local acting company was specifically founded to stage events in support of the Beechwood Avenue structure, which was built in 1850.

Performance to be held at Maple Grove

The 3 pm performance will take place in one of Maple Grove's first -floor rooms, which easily accomodates an audience of 50 people.

A theatrical - or staged - reading features actors that read individual, rehearsed roles from a script or play in absence of scenery, props or costumes. In the case of the May 16 reading, it will be directed by longtime regional theater set designer and director Bill Peckham.

Linda Roper, who founded the Over the Pond to Poughkeepsie Ensemble last year, worked with local talent to present five works at Maple Grove in 2009. A native of England, Roper attended the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama.

She performed in Reparatory theater overseas and after relocating to the United States in 1998 has been part of various regional productions.

"Charlie's Birds" was written by Robert Cessna, a Woodstock author who passed away last summer.

"Bob and his partner Gerry Hopkins, who is an artist, came to see me when I was doing a George Bernard Shaw play named 'Major Barbara'," Roper said. "Bob told me that he had just written 'Charlie's Birds' and he wanted me to play the lead in it.

"We did a staged reading at an art gallery in Saugerties and it was very successful. I loved the play and when I got involved with Maple Grove and saw the historic house I thought that it would be a great venue for play readings."

Just prior to Cessna's death, he granted Roper permission to stage a reading of his new work at Maple Grove.

Peckham, who recently retired from a career with New York State, has worked with the County Players in Wappingers Falls and other regional acting companies for more than 30 years. He shared his motivation to direct "Charlie's Birds" at the May 16 event.

Good, strong character sketch

"This play appealed to me because I thought the characters were well developed and interesting," he said. "It's a bit of a surreal, over-the-top comedy about a brother and sister that live together and are dependent upon each other.

"He's kind of a simple soul and she's overbearing. The play starts when her husband dies and suddenly an aunt that they had no knowledge of shows up and tries to convince them that she's the sister of their long departed mother."

The aunt , played by Roper, attempts to move in with the siblings and the interaction that ensues is entertaining and amusing.

Purest form of theater

"If it is really done well a reading is like the purest form of theater," Peckham said. The audience has to focus on listening to the content and the words and they're not as distracted by scenery and props and costumes.

"What I like about it is that it gets right to the guts of the material."

Roper said that in many ways the ambiance of the 19th cuntury home's rough interior lends itself to the various productions presented.

It's a very old house that is kind of tattered and has not been done up yet and a lot of the productions that we've done seem to fit in there well," she said. "If you look out the windows and see all the trees and the grass, the outside seems to come right into the room through the windows. You're part of something bigger in that house.

"When we did 'Moon for the Misbegotten' last year, it was kind of perfect because it was meant to be on a farm porch. It was wonderful."

Joining Roper at the reading are local actors Zsuzsa Manna and Michael Frohnhoefer, both of whom have been active in other productions in the area.

Aside from attempting to raise funds to continue Maple Grove's restoration, Roper said that just having people visit the historic structure to attend the staged readings is reason enough to do them.

"It's a beautiful house that generations of people lived in and many people don't even know that it is there," Roper said. "It's nice to have it being used and to have people become aware of it.

"While admission is free to the Over the Pond to Poughkeepsie Ensemble readings, attendees are encouraged to make a dontation to assisit the restoration effort. A box set up in the home is available for donations, which can be made by cash or check.

The Over the pond to Poughkeepsie Ensemble event is one of a few different initiatives staged at Maple Grove to raise funds. Another popular series is the Sunday Author Readings that enables attendees to hear parts of a new work and then discuss it with the author.

In addition to acquiring a grant, the Saint Simeon Foundation and the Maple Grove Restoration Committee have helped to finance the ongoing work done at the site. A gala fund raiser is held on the grounds in June to bolster funds as well.

Maple Grove is located at 24 Beechwood Avenue in Poughkeepsie. For more information about the May 16 reading or other events at the site visit online at www.maplegroveny.org or call 471-3248.

 

Tuesday, May 11, 2010
Performance at historic home helps fund its restoration

Anthony P. Musso
For the Poughkeepsie Journal

The Over the Pond to Poughkeepsie Ensemble will present a theatrical reading of the play "Charlie's Birds" at 3 p.m. Sunday to raise funds for the continuing restoration of Maple Grove, a 19th-century historic home in Poughkeepsie.

The local acting company was specifically founded to stage events in support of the Beechwood Avenue structure, which was built in 1850.

The performance will take place in one of Maple Grove's first-floor rooms, which accommodates an audience of 50 people.

A theatrical — or staged — reading features actors who read individual, rehearsed roles from a script without scenery, props or costumes. "Charlie's Birds" will be directed by longtime regional director Bill Peckham.

Linda Roper, who founded the Over the Pond to Poughkeepsie Ensemble last year, worked with local talent to present five works at Maple Grove in 2009. Roper, a native of England, attended the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama. She performed in repertory theater overseas and, after relocating to the United States in 1998, has been part of regional productions.

"Charlie's Birds" was written by Robert Cessna, a Woodstock author who died during the summer.

Just before his death, Cessna granted Roper permission to stage a reading of his new work at Maple Grove.

Peckham, who recently retired from a career with New York state, has worked with the County Players in Wappingers Falls and other regional acting companies for more than 30 years. He shared his motivation to direct "Charlie's Birds."

"This play appealed to me because I thought the characters were well-developed and interesting," he said. "It's a bit of a surreal, over-the-top comedy about a brother and sister that live together and are dependent upon each other.

"He's kind of a simple soul and she's overbearing. The play starts when her husband dies and suddenly an aunt that they had no knowledge of shows up and tries to convince them that she's the sister of their long departed mother." The aunt, played by Roper, attempts to move in with the siblings, and the interaction that ensues is the heart of the play.

"If it is really done well, a reading is like the purest form of theater," Peckham said. "The audience has to focus on listening to the content and the words, and they're not as distracted by scenery and props and costumes.

"What I like about it is that it gets right to the guts of the material," he said.

Roper said that in many ways the ambience of the 19th-century home's interior lends itself to the various productions presented there.

"It's a very old house that is kind of tattered and has not been done up yet, and a lot of the productions that we've done seem to fit in there well," she said. "If you look out the windows and see all the trees and the grass, the outside seems to come right into the room through the windows. You're part of something bigger in that house."

Joining Roper at the reading are local actors Zsuzsa Manna and Michael Frohnhoefer, both of whom have been active in other productions in the area.

Aside from attempting to raise funds to continue Maple Grove's restoration, Roper said just having people visit the historic structure to attend the staged readings is reason enough to do them.

"It's a beautiful house that generations of people lived in, and many people don't even know that it is there," Roper said. "It's nice to have it being used and to have people become aware of it."

While admission is free to the Over the Pond to Poughkeepsie Ensemble reading, attendees are encouraged to make a donation to assist the restoration effort. A box set up in the home is available for donations, which can be made by cash or check. Visit online at www.maplegroveny.org or call 845-471-3248.

Reach Anthony P. Musso at railcommute@aol.com.